Adding Tenth and Hundredth

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Adding Tenth and Hundredth
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.C.5

Basics on the topic Adding Tenth and Hundredth

Content

In This Adding Tenths and Hundredths Video

Axel and Tank are baking a cake, with fractional parts of ingredients. They need to practice adding tenths and hundredths fractions so they know how much flour and sugar they’re using for their cake! At the end, you will find an adding tenths and hundredths fractions worksheet.

Adding Fractions Tenths and Hundredths

When adding fractions with tenths and hundredths, first, set up the problem.

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Next, look at the denominator, the bottom number, of both fractions. Since they’re not the same, or like, we need to convert one fraction to have the same denominator as the other.

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To do this, we can multiply to fractions with the ten denominator by ten to make one hundred. When we do this, we also need to multiply the numerator, the top number, by ten as well.

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Now both denominators are one hundred, we can solve the problem!

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Adding Tenths and Hundredths - Summary

Remember, when adding tenths and hundredths fractions, make sure you have like denominators before solving the problem. The denominator of the sum will always remain the same, and you only need to add together the numerators.

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Below, you will find an adding tenths and hundredths worksheet, with adding tenths and hundredths questions.

Transcript Adding Tenth and Hundredth

Axel has decided to bake a delicious cake with leftover ingredients. "Hey Tank, I need you to calculate how much flour is left, and while you're at it, do the same for the sugar, please!" Let's help Tank calculate the total flour and sugar Axel has to bake with by adding tenths and hundredths. A tenth represents one part of a whole divided into ten equal parts. We can represent tenths as a fraction by writing the parts we have for the numerator, over a denominator of ten. A hundredth represents one part of a whole divided into one hundred equal parts. We can represent hundredths as a fraction by writing the parts we have for the numerator, over a denominator of one hundred. Let's practice adding the leftover bags of flour together. One bag has seventy-seven hundredths of flour, and the other bag has one-tenth. We are solving seventy-seven hundredths plus one-tenth. First, make sure both fractions have the same, or like, denominators. Tenths and hundredths are not like denominators, so we need to multiply the tenths fraction by ten, because it is the least common multiple of ten and one hundred! Ten times ten is one hundred. Since we multiplied the denominator of the tenths fraction by ten, we must do the same for its numerator. One times ten is ten. One tenth and ten hundredths are equivalent fractions. Now, we can add the fractions because both denominators are one hundred! The denominator remains one hundred since we are adding. Then, add the numerators. Seventy-seven plus ten equals eighty-seven. Axel has eighty-seven hundredths of flour to bake with. Now we know how to add tenths and hundredths, let's help Tank solve how much sugar Axel has to bake with! One bag of sugar has thirty-hundredths left, and the other bag has two-tenths left. We are solving thirty hundredths plus two-tenths. What is the first step? Make sure the fractions have like denominators. How can we make like denominators with these fractions? Multiply the numerator and denominator of the tenths fraction by ten. Ten times ten is one hundred. Two times ten is twenty. Two tenths and twenty hundredths are equivalent fractions. What is the final step? Add the fractions. The denominator remains one hundred. Thirty plus twenty equals fifty. We can simplify fifty-hundredths because fifty goes into both fifty and one hundred. Fifty goes into one hundred two times. Fifty goes into fifty one time. Axel has one half a bag of sugar for baking his cake! While Axel bakes the cake, let's review! Remember, when adding tenths and hundredths, first, make sure both fractions have the same, or common, denominators. Second, keep the denominator the same in the sum, since this never changes when adding fractions. Third, add together the numerators. Don't forget to simplify when possible! "It's ready, Tank!" "Oh boy, I have been dreaming of this cake all day!"