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Fractions Greater than 1 on a Number Line

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Fractions Greater than 1 on a Number Line
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Basics on the topic Fractions Greater than 1 on a Number Line

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InThis Fractions Greater Than 1 On A Number Line Video

Axel and Tank are at the carnival ready to race seahorses and win prizes! They must move their sea horses along the path and identify their locations using fractions greater than 1 on a number line. In this video, we teach Axel and Tank about two ways of labeling fractions greater than 1 on a number line.

Fractions On A Number Line Greater Than 1 Third Grade

You can identify fractions on a number line greater than 1 as improper fractions or mixed numbers. Improper fractions have numerators that are greater than their denominators. Mixed numbers have a whole number and a fraction.

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Third Grade Fractions On A Number Line Greater Than 1: Improper Fractions

To identify the improper fraction, begin by locating the point on the number line. Next, count the number of spaces until you reach it. Write this number as the numerator, or top number.

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Then, count how many parts one whole is divided into. Write three as the denominator, or bottom number.

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So, eight-thirds is the location of this improper fraction on the number line.

3rd Grade Fractions Greater Than 1 On A Number Line: Mixed Numbers

To identify the fraction greater than one as a mixed number, begin by locating the point on the number line. Next, count the amount of whole numbers before the point. Write the whole number on the left.

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Then, count the number of spaces between the last whole number and the point. Write this number as the numerator, or top number.

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Then, count how many parts one whole is divided into. Write that number as the denominator, or bottom number.

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So this same point could also be read as the mixed number two and two thirds. Another way to state is that this fraction has two wholes plus two more thirds remaining.

Summary of Steps: How to Identify Fractions On A Number Line Greater Than 1

  • First, locate the point.

  • Second, count the number of spaces to that point. Write this number as the numerator.

  • Then, count how many parts one whole is divided into. Write this number as the denominator.

  • The final number is the location of the improper fraction on the number line.

  • For mixed numbers, you can count the whole numbers first, then add on the remaining fractions.

Fractions On A Number Line Greater Than 1 Third Grade Worksheet

Have you practiced fractions on a number line greater than 1 questions yet? On this website, you can also find fractions on a number line greater than 1 worksheets, like worksheets plotting fractions greater than 1 on a number line, and fractions on a number line greater than 1 activities.

Transcript Fractions Greater than 1 on a Number Line

Axel and Tank are at the carnival. They can't wait to play Racing Seahorses! The player whose seahorse finishes first wins a prize! Ready, set, go! As they race, Axel and Tank want to identify where their seahorses are... but they dont know how! Let's help them by identifying "Fractions Greater than 1 on a Number Line." You can identify fractions greater than one on a number line as improper fractions or mixed numbers. Improper fractions have numerators that are greater than their denominators. Mixed numbers have a whole number and a fraction. To identify the improper fraction, begin by locating the point on the number line. Next, count the number of spaces until you reach it. Let's count the number of spaces one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight. The point is on eight. Write this number here as the numerator, or top number. Then, count how many parts one whole is divided into. Let's count together one, two, three. Write three here as the denominator, or bottom number. Eight-thirds is the location of this improper fraction on the number line. We could also read it as the mixed number two and two thirds because this fraction has two wholes plus two more thirds remaining. Now, let's help Tank locate the position of his seahorse in the race. First, we locate the seahorse as a point on the number line. Next, we count the number of spaces until we reach it: one, two, three, four, five, six, seven! Write seven as the numerator. Then, count how many parts one whole is divided into one, two, three, four, five. Write five as the denominator. Tank's seahorse is located at seven-fifths on the number line. We could also say its located at one and two fifths because this fraction has one whole plus two more fifths remaining. Let's help Axel find his seahorse! First, we locate the seahorse as a point on the number line. What do we do next? We count the number of parts to that point: one, two, three, four and write four as the numerator. What should we do next? Next, we count how many parts one whole is divided into one, two. Write two as the denominator. Where is Axel's seahorse located? Axel's seahorse is located at four-seconds on the number line. Do you notice anything else about this improper fraction? Four-seconds is also written as two on the number line. This means that four-seconds is the same as, or equivalent to, the number two. The third player's seahorse is here. What is the numerator? The numerator is thirteen because we counted thirteen spaces to get to their seahorse. What is the denominator? The denominator is seven because one whole is divided into seven spaces. Where is the third player's seahorse? Their seahorse is at thirteen-ninths on the number line. What is the equivalent mixed number? It's one and six sevenths because this fraction has one whole plus six more sevenths remaining. "Folks! We have a winner!" Before we find out who won let's remember. We can identify fractions greater than one on a number line as improper fractions or mixed numbers. Improper fractions have numerators that are larger than their denominators. Mixed numbers have whole numbers and fractions. To read the improper fraction, first locate the point. Second, count the number of spaces to that point. Write this number as the numerator. Then, count how many parts one whole is divided into. Write this number as the denominator. The final number is the location of the improper fraction on the number line. For mixed numbers, you can count the whole numbers first, then add on the remaining fractions. Congratulations, Tank you came from behind but, slow and steady always wins the race. So, you can have two prizes! .