Words, Syllables & Sounds

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Words, Syllables & Sounds
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In this Kindergarten Video on the Knowledge of the Sounds and Syllables of Words...

Dee and Kala are working at the library. However, this is a special library! Here, you can borrow words, syllables, and sounds. It’s up to Dee and Kala to sort the returned words into their syllables, and sounds, but they aren’t sure how. In this video, we demonstrate an understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes) to help Dee and Kala organize the returns.

Analyze Words into Syllables and Sounds

We use words, syllables, and sounds when we speak, read and write. Words are made up of syllables which are made up of sounds. Understanding that spoken words are made up of sounds and syllables is an important step in learning to read and write.

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Analyze Words into Syllables and Sounds: Words

Words also have meaning. Words can be large, like tomato, or they can be small, like in. Saying words correctly and clearly with the accepted sounds and syllables reflects a child’s phonological progression.

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Analyze Words into Syllables and Sounds: Syllables

Words consist of a group of sounds called syllables. Syllables are words or word parts that have one vowel sound and take one puff of air to say. We can use claps for how to write words in syllables. Words like tomato have many syllables. If you clap out the word, you will hear three parts: to-ma-to. This means there are three syllables in the word tomato! Other words, like 'in', have only one syllable. If we clap it out, we only hear a single part: in.

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Analyze Words into Syllables and Sounds: Sounds

The ability to hear the difference between sounds and syllables in spoken words is important. Sounds are the special noises that letters make in a word. We can use our fingers to touch each letter sound. In the word 'tomato', each letter makes its own special sound: /t/ /ō/ /m/ /ā/ /t/ /ō/. Each letter of the word 'in' also makes its own special sound: /ĭ/ /n/. The echoing repetition of sounds in the syllables of words can be helpful to those learning to differentiate between phonemes.

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Words, Syllables, Sounds: A Summary

  • Words are made up of syllables which are made up of sounds.

  • Syllables are words or word parts that we clap out to mark.

  • Sounds are special letter noises that we can touch to hear.

Kindergarten: Demonstrate Understanding of Spoken Words, Syllables, and Sounds (Phonemes) Activities

Have you practiced words, sounds and syllables yet? On this website, you can also find activities to teach and demonstrate understanding of spoken words ,syllables, and sounds (phonemes).

Transcript Words, Syllables & Sounds

Dee and Kala are working at the library! This is a special library where you can borrow words, syllables, and sounds! When an item is returned, Dee and Kala must sort it into its word, its syllables, and its sounds. But, they are not sure how! Can you help Dee and Kala? ... Let's learn about... "Words, Syllables, and Sounds" together! We use words, syllables, and sounds when we speak and write. Words are made up of syllables which are made up of sounds. Words also have meaning. Words can be big like 'tomato' or they can be small like 'in'. Syllables are word or word parts that have one vowel sound and take one puff of air to say. We use claps to mark syllables. Words like tomato have many syllables. Let's clap together: to…ma…to. We clapped one, two, three times so we have three syllables! Words like 'in' have only one syllable. Let's clap it together: in. Sounds are the special noises that letters make in a word. We can use our fingers to touch each letter sound. Each letter in 'tomato' makes its own special sound: /t/ /oh/ /m/ /ā/ /t/ /oh/. Each letter of 'in' also makes its own special sound: /ĭ/ /n/. Let's practice sorting our first example: mitten. First, we think about what 'mitten' means. It is a piece of clothing that keeps our hands warm. So, the word is mitten. Next, let's clap it together to count the syllables: mit…ten . We clapped one, two times so it has two syllables! Finally, we touch every letter in each syllable to hear the sounds: /m/ /ĭ/ /t/ … /t/ /ĭ/ /n/ mitten! Now that we've put away mitten, let's sort the last example: A. First, we think about what A means; it means having one of something like A piece of candy. So, the word is A. Next, we clap it to count the syllables... A. It has one clap or one syllable. Finally, we touch the letter A to hear the sound: /ā/. So A is a word, a syllable and a sound! A is a special letter that should go somewhere special! "I know just the place for A!" Before we see where A went, let's remember! Words are made up of syllables which are made up of sounds. Syllables are word or word parts that we clap out. Sounds are special letter noises that we touch to hear. "What A library!"