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Comparative Adverbs

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Comparative Adverbs
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.3.1G

Basics on the topic Comparative Adverbs

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Pip and Koko just completed a round of their favorite game: Bigger, Better, Hero Adventure! The score screen is using a comparative adverb to describe how they did! Let’s learn what's a comparative adverb and see some comparative adverb examples before their next round!

What are Comparative Adverbs?

Whats a comparative adverb? The comparative adverb definition states that it compares two actions or performances to one another.

How do we make Comparative Adverbs?

In this section we will learn that there are many different ways to make a comparative form of an adverb. Learning about these rules will help you answer the question: How do we use comparative adverbs? Each rule will also follow with comparative form of adverbs examples so you can also learn what is a comparative adverb example?

Regular Comparative Adverbs

Regular comparative adverbs follow rules and patterns.

  • ​​If an adverb has one syllable, add the suffix er to the end. For example, fast is a one syllable adverb. We change it to the comparative form by adding the suffix er, making it faster.

_regular-comparative-adverbs-one-syllable-faster-comparative-adverb.svg

  • If an adverb has two syllables, add more or less in front. For example, quickly and often are two syllable adverbs. We change it to the comparative form by adding more or less in front, making them more quickly and less often.

regular-comparative-adverbs-two-syllables-more-quickly-less-often-comparative-adverb.svg

Irregular Comparative Adverbs

Irregular comparative adverbs don't follow any of these rules, so we need to memorize how to make each of these adverbs comparative!

For example, the comparative adverb for far is further or farther.

regular-irregular-adverbs-far-further-farther-comparative-adverb.svg

Informal Comparative Adverbs

Informal comparative adverbs are usually used in speech. Formal comparative adverbs are usually used in writing. These adverbs are also considered irregular because they don’t follow any rules, so we just have to memorize them!

What is a Comparative Adverb Summary

Whats a comparative adverb? The comparative adverb definition states that it compares two actions or performances to one another. Regular comparative adverbs follow rules and patterns. Irregular comparative adverbs don't follow any of these rules, so we need to memorize how to make each of these adverbs comparative!

Want some more practice with what is a comparative adverb example? On this website you will find examples, worksheets, and other activities!

Transcript Comparative Adverbs

Comparative Adverbs Pip and Koko just completed a round of their favorite game: Bigger, Better, Hero Adventure! The score screen uses comparative adverbs to describe how they did! Let's take a closer look. An adverb describes an action by answering questions such as: how?, when?, where?, how often?, and in what way?. A comparative adverb compares two actions or performances to one another. Regular comparative adverbs follow rules and patterns. If an adverb has ONE syllable, or one single unbroken sound, add the suffix to the end. For example, 'fast' is a one syllable adverb. We change it to the comparative form by adding the suffix , making it 'fast-er'. The score screen says: Pip collected the coins FASTER than Koko. If an adverb has TWO syllables, add 'more' or 'less' in front. For example, 'quickly' and 'often' are two syllable adverbs. We change it to the comparative form by adding 'more' or 'less' in front, making them 'more quickly' and 'less often'. The score screen says: Koko finished the level more quickly than Pip, and ran into the cacti less often. Irregular comparative adverbs don't follow any of these rules, so... we need to memorize how to make each of these adverbs comparative! For example, changing the adverb badly to worse... well to better... far to further or farther... little to less... much to more... and early to earlier. The score screen says: Koko and Pip finished the level earlier than the last attempt. Informal comparative adverbs have a FORMAL version with the ending suffix , and an INFORMAL version without it. Informal comparative adverbs are usually used in speech. Formal comparative adverbs are usually used in writing. Let's take a look at some examples: To make the adverb cheap or cheaply INFORMAL comparative... we add the suffix , making it cheap-er. To make it FORMAL comparative, we add the suffix and 'more' to the front, making it 'more cheaply'. To make the adverb slow or slowly INFORMAL comparative... we add the suffix , making it slow-er. To make it FORMAL comparative, we add the suffix and 'more' to the front, making it 'more slowly'. The score screen says: If Pip and Koko move more slowly next time, they may collect more coins than in today's game. Before Koko and Pip start the next level, let's summarize. Remember, (...) a comparative adverb compares two actions or performances to one another. Regular comparative adverbs follow rules and patterns while irregular comparative adverbs don't follow any rules, so... we need to memorize how to make each of these adverbs comparative! Informal comparative adverbs are usually used in speech and... formal comparative adverbs are usually used in writing. "Oh! I got it Koko! I'm going to choose this option more QUICKLY than you!" [Pip clicks don't save] "PIP NOOOOOOO! That was my highest score!" "Well it looks like we get a rematch!"