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Commonly Confused Words

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Commonly Confused Words
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Basics on the topic Commonly Confused Words

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Pip just finished his contest entry to become an influencer for Surf Squad, a surf company. However, Koko found some spelling mistakes Pip needs to correct before he submits his entry. Let’s help Pip by learning about commonly confused words.

What are Commonly Confused Words?

What are easily confused words? To find the commonly confused words definition we will look at the definition of homophones. Homophones are words that have the same pronunciation, but can have different meanings, origins, or spellings. We can use context clues and the meaning of each surrounding word to help determine which is the correct homophone to use.

The next section will talk about some of the most commonly confused words in english.

Commonly Confused Words Examples

What are some commonly confused words? Let’s take a look at the commonly confused words there their they're in Pip’s sentence:

Second-I-know-sharks-are-out-their-since-it’s-there-home-but-I’m-not-scared-because_they're-friendly!-their-shows-something-that-belongs-to-someone-there-location-or-place-they’re-contraction-for-they-are-commonly-confused-words.svg

There are three different spellings and meanings for this word. Take a look at the commonly confused words list on the right with each definition.

  • Their - shows something that belongs to someone
  • There- a location or place
  • They’re- a contraction for they are

Now that we know each different spelling and meaning, let’s correct words commonly confused!

Which homophone goes in the first blank? There, because the context clue out tells us the sharks are in a location: the ocean. In the second blank we write, their, because the context clue home tells us the ocean is where the sharks live. In the third blank we write they're, just like Pip wrote before because the sentence states they are friendly.

Second-I-know-sharks-are-out-there-since-it’s-their-home-but-I’m-not-scared-because_they're-friendly!-their-shows-something-that-belongs-to-someone-there-location-or-place-they’re-contraction-for-they-are-commonly-confused-words.svg

Now that we’ve seen examples of commonly confused words, let’s summarize.

Commonly Confused Words Summary

Homophones are words that have the same pronunciation, but can have different meanings, origins, or spellings. We can use context clues and the meaning of each surrounding word to help determine which is the correct homophone to use.

Want some more commonly confused words practice? On this website you can find commonly confused words exercises, a commonly confused words worksheet, commonly confused words worksheets along with activities.

Transcript Commonly Confused Words

Pip just finished his contest entry to become an influencer for Surf Squad, a surf company. "I can already see myself ripping the most gnarly waves..." "Not so fast Pip (...), this is going to need some spelling corrections before you submit it!" "Huh? These are all spelled correctly, so what needs to be fixed?" Let's help Pip by learning about... Commonly Confused Words. Homophones are words that have the same pronunciation, but can have different meanings, origins, or spellings. We can use context clues and the meaning of each surrounding word... to help determine which is the correct homophone to use. Let's read Pip's text: (...) I think I should be a Surf Squad influencer for several reasons. First of all, Surf Squad influencers love going two the beach and I do too! Second, I know sharks are out their since it’s there home, but I'm not scared because they're friendly! Last, you’re surfboard company needs someone who loves surfing, well your done searching because it's me! Now, let's look at the word 'to.' There are three different spellings and meanings for this word. Two (...) is the number that comes after one. Too (...) means also or something excessive. The last way of spelling 'to', that is not used in this sentence, shows where something is moving or going. Let's read Pip's sentence again, paying close attention to any context clues that may tell us which homophone to use: First of all, Surf Squad influencers love going two the beach and I do too! Which homophone goes in the first blank? (...) "To" (...), because the context clue GOING tells us the influencers are going TO the beach. In the second blank we write "too", just like Pip wrote before... because the context clue I DO tells us Pip likes doing it also. Now, let's look at the word 'their'. There are three different spellings and meanings for this word. Their, (...) shows something that belongs to someone. There, (...) is a location or place. They’re, (...) is a contraction for they are. Let's read Pip's sentence again, paying close attention to the context clues: Second, I know sharks are out their since it’s there home, but I’m not scared because they're friendly! Which homophone goes in the first blank? (...) "There", (...) because the context clue OUT tells us the sharks are in a location: the ocean. In the second blank we write, "their"... because the context clue HOME tells us the ocean is where the sharks live. In the third blank we write "they're", just like Pip wrote before... because the sentence states THEY ARE friendly. Now, let's look at the word 'your'. There are two different spellings and meanings for this word. You're, (...) is a contraction for you are. Your, (...) refers to something a person has or owns. Let's read Pip's sentence again, paying close attention to the context clues: Last, you’re company needs someone who loves surfing, well your done searching because it's me! Which homophone goes in the first blank? (...) Your, (...) because the context clue COMPANY tells us the surfboard company belongs to the owner. In the second blank we write "you're"... because the sentence states YOU ARE done searching. Now Pip's entry is fixed, let's review while he waits to see if he is chosen! Remember, (...) homophones are words that have the same pronunciation, but can have different meanings, origins, or spellings. We can use context clues and the meaning of each surrounding word... to help determine which is the correct homophone to use. "That's it Pip!" "This wave is totally awesome dude!" "Wait, you're just practicing what you want me to record while you're in the water right?" "Oh (...) no, I don't actually know how to surf, I just think surfing looks cool."

Commonly Confused Words exercise

Would you like to apply the knowledge you’ve learned? You can review and practice it with the tasks for the video Commonly Confused Words .
  • Match the fragments to the correct homophone.

    Hints

    They're is the contraction of they are. Try replacing the word they're with the words they are to find a match!

    Their indicates something that belongs to someone. Look at the sentence fragments on the right. Where is there something you can have or own?

    Solution

    In deep water is a place, so this is matched with there.
    A home and a favorite activity are things that can belong to someone, so this is matched with their.
    They are is shortened to they're, so they're friendly and large are both describing the sharks.

  • Find the homophone errors in Pip's letter.

    Hints

    Your and their come before things that can be owned or had. Find these sentences first.

    You're is short for you are, and they're is short for they are. Try replacing these with the longer forms to find the correct match!

    Solution

    The beach is a location, so we use to. This was correct.

    I also love going to the beach, refers to also, so we use I do too. This was incorrect.

    Out there is a place, so we use there. This was incorrect.

    Home is a possession, so we use their. This was correct.

    They are friendly can be shortened to they're friendly. This was correct.

    A company can be owned, so we write your company. This was correct.

    You are done searching can be shortened to you're done searching. This was incorrect.

  • Find the correct homophones in the paragraph.

    Hints

    Remember the homophone you're, short for you are, is spelled with an apostrophe!

    Solution

    You are never going to find a better match is contracted to you're.
    A company, employee, goals, and problems are all things that can belong to something or someone, so we use the possessive form, your.

  • Help Pip find the correct homophones for the sentence fragments.

    Hints

    Remember, your and you're are homophones, and their and they're are homophones.

    You're = you are
    They're = they are
    Say the words out loud before the rest of each sentence fragment. If it fits, it is a contraction.

    Solution

    A school, dog, and shoelaces are all things you can own or have, so these sentences must use the possessive form: your or their.

    The rest of the sentences describe what or how how a person is, so they are contractions of you are or they are.

  • Identify the correct homophones.

    Hints

    The word to is used to show movement or direction. Can you find a sentence where someone is moving or going somewhere?

    The word two represents the number 2. Can you find a sentence where it seems something is being counted?

    Solution

    To describes direction or movement, so we use this when Pip goes to the beach.

    Pip has 2 surfboards, so we use the two to indicate the number or amount.

    Pip may be a bit excessive with how much he loves surfing and how much time he spends surfing, so we use too.

  • Help proofread Pip's letter for homophone mistakes.

    Hints

    To indicates a direction or location. Two is how we spell the number 2.

    Their is used to indicate a possession, something you own or have. There indicates a location or place.

    Solution

    The word two is incorrect because this spelling indicates the number 2.
    If I forget anything their good at sharing, should be they're or they are good at sharing.
    Your going to be so jealous is not possessive, so it should be you're or you are going to be jealous.