Collecting and Organizing Data

Rate this video

Ø 5.0 / 1 ratings

The author
Avatar
Team Digital
Collecting and Organizing Data
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.1.MD.C.4

Information about the video Collecting and Organizing Data

Contents

In this video, Gus and Nari are at a party! Gus swings hard and breaks open the piñata and picks a piece up to eat. However Nari says before they start eating, they need to organize and collect data on the candy so they can share it fair and square. Let’s help them by collecting and organizing data.

What is Collecting and Organizing Data?

Data is information we can collect and sort to help us organize and understand facts, numbers, and measurements. We can practice collecting data in two ways:

The first way is by observing, which means using our eyes to look at the data. The second way is to ask questions to collect more information about the data.

nari-eyes-one-observing-nari-mouth-two-ask-questions-collecting-and-organizing-data.svg

Sometimes when we collect data there is a lot and it's hard to answer questions if the information is all mixed up. If we organize data into a chart, that can help answer questions more easily.

Organizing Data Practice

For example, if we need to find out how many circles there are we first organize the shapes by putting them into categories.

empty-chart-triangles-squares-circles-mixed-up-collecting-and-organizing-data.svg

chart-row-one-squares-row-two-triangles-row-three-circles-collecting-and-organizing-data.svg

Now that we've organized the shapes into categories, we can look at the data with our eyes to find the answer. Even though we see circles, squares, and triangles, always remember what the question is asking: how many circles are there?

If you look at the chart and count, you will see that there are three circles!

Collecting and Organizing Data Summary

Data is information we can collect and sort to help us understand facts, numbers, and measurements. Sometimes the data is mixed up so we organize it into categories to help us answer questions about the data.

Want some more collecting and organizing data practice? On this website there is a collecting and organizing data worksheet along with other activities, and exercises.

Transcript Collecting and Organizing Data

"Nice hit Gus!" "Before we start eating, let's organize and collect data on the candy so we can share it fair and square." "Collecting and Organizing Data". Data , also known as data ... is information we can collect... and sort to help us organize and understand facts, numbers, and measurements. How do we collect data? (...) We can collect data in two ways. The first way is by observing, which means using our eyes to look at the data. The second way is to ask questions to collect more information about the data. Sometimes when we've collected a lot of data, it's hard to answer questions if the information is all mixed up. Organizing the data in a chart can help answer questions more easily. For example, if we need to find out how many circles there are... we first organize the shapes by putting them into categories. What different shapes do you see? (...) There are squares, (...) triangles, (...) and circles. Let's organize them into a chart. We can put all the squares here, (...) the triangles here, (...) and the circles here. Now that we've organized the shapes into categories, we can look at the data with our eyes to find the answer. Even though we see circles, squares, and triangles, always remember what the question is asking: how many CIRCLES are there? Let's count the circles together (...) one (...) two (...) three! There are three circles. Now that we've practiced organizing and collecting data let's help Gus and Nari! They need help figuring out how many pieces of candy they have... but it's all mixed up with the bouncy balls and rubber ducks! Let's use THIS chart to organize the shapes into different categories! We can put all the rubber ducks here, (...) the bouncy balls here, (...) and the candy here. Even though we see bouncy balls, rubber ducks, and candy, always remember what the question is asking: how many pieces of CANDY do they have? (...) Let's count together (...) one (...) two (...) three (...) four (...) five (...) six (...) seven (...) eight! Gus and Nari will share eight pieces of candy. Before they do that, let's remember. Data is information we can collect and sort to help us understand facts, numbers, and measurements. Sometimes the data is mixed up so... we organize it into categories to help us answer questions about the data. "Alright Gus, now that we've sorted the candy we can..." "Gus! That wasn't candy, that was a rubber duck!"