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Narrative Writing: Adding Dialogue to a Story

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Narrative Writing: Adding Dialogue to a Story
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.2.3

Basics on the topic Narrative Writing: Adding Dialogue to a Story

Learn all about adding dialogue to a story in this video.

Transcript Narrative Writing: Adding Dialogue to a Story

"Ernie! I finished my own story for the writing competition!" "No one is talking, Jane!" "Oh, how can we make my story more exciting with talking?" Let's join our friends and learn all about narrative writing: Adding dialogue to a story. When writing a personal narrative, it is usually a good idea to include dialogue, or a character speaking. Dialogue is a usually conversation between two or more people, and is shown by quotation marks, like these! If you see these around words, you know that it was said by someone in the story. When we add dialogue to text, we often include WHO said it, using words like said, told, or asked. So, why should you add dialogue to your writing? Well, we already learned it shows what was said, but it also gives more information about the story, can help sequence the events, and adds voices to your story, which can make it more fun and engaging for the reader. Now let's take a look at Jane's story, and help her add some dialogue. So far, Jane has written; I told Ernie a pretend bee fact. Ernie was surprised. We laughed that he fell for my trick. Before Jane can add dialogue, she needs to think to herself: 'What was actually said?' If she can't remember, she should then think: 'What would this person have said?' "Oh yes! I remember, I said; bees ride bikes in the hive!" We write 'bees ride bikes in the hive', in quotation marks after 'I told Ernie a pretend bee fact'. Any dialogue always starts on a new line. "Do you remember my response?" "Oh no. I don't. But, I think you would have said: what? Really?" Since Jane knows what Ernie may have said, she can add: 'what? Really?' to her narrative, after where it says 'Ernie was surprised'. "And then in the end I told you: 'I can't bee-lieve you fell for that!" before we laughed!" Did you catch the dialogue that we can add to Jane's narrative? Jane said 'I can't bee-lieve you fell for that', before they laughed, so we can put that here, like this. "Thank you Ernie, my personal narrative looks better now and is ready for judging." "Well, let's submit it then!" While Ernie and Jane wait to see if they won, let's review! Today we learned about adding dialogue to narratives. Dialogue is usually a conversation between two or more people. To add dialogue, we use quotation marks, like these, to show speech. When adding speech to a personal narrative, always think to yourself; what was actually said? If you can't remember, then think; what would this person have said? "I mean, this is a fantastic and beautiful golden pen. But it's kind of too... big?"

Narrative Writing: Adding Dialogue to a Story exercise

Would you like to apply the knowledge you’ve learned? You can review and practice it with the tasks for the video Narrative Writing: Adding Dialogue to a Story.
  • Explain why we use dialogue in narrative texts.

    Hints

    Dialogue can help explain what happens first, next, and last in a story.

    Adding dialogue helps the reader imagine what the characters act and sound like.

    There are 3 true choices and 1 false choice.

    Solution

    TRUE:

    • Dialogue gives more information about the story.
    • Dialogue can help sequence events in a story.
    • Dialogue adds voices to a story, which can make it more fun to read.
    FALSE:
    • Dialogue is easier to read.
    Dialogue doesn't use a different language than non-dialogue, so it is equally easy or difficult to read

  • Find dialogue and signal words.

    Hints

    Dialogue uses quotation marks around the words.

    Dialogue usually goes together with words like said, told, answered, or asked to show who is speaking.

    There are 3 examples of speech in quotation marks and 3 signal words.

    Solution

    This text is speech or the voice of the character. We recognize it from the quotation marks around the words.

    • "Bees ride bikes in the hive!"
    • "What? Really?"
    • "I can't BEE - lieve you fell for that!"
    These words show who is talking, and can be signal words for dialogue.
    • Told
    • Said

  • Find signal words and dialogue.

    Hints

    Dialogue uses quotation marks around the words.

    Dialogue usually goes together with signal words like said, told, answered, or asked to show who is speaking.

    There are 3 examples of speech in quotation marks and 2 signal words.

    Solution

    This text is speech or the voice of the character. We recognize it from the quotation marks around the words.

    • "Ernie!"
    • "I finished my whole story already for the writing competition!"
    • "But no one is talking Jane"
    These words show who is talking, and can be signal words for dialogue.
    • Exclaimed
    • Answered

  • Complete the conversation.

    Hints

    Dialogue uses quotation marks around the words.

    Dialogue usually goes together with words like said, or asked to show who is speaking.
    Asked would follow dialogue with a question.

    Solution

    Jane wanted Ernie's attention.
    "Hey Ernie!" she called. "Heads up!"
    Ernie sat up.
    "What is it?" he asked.
    Jane picked up her water balloon.
    "You'll see soon," Jane answered.

  • Find examples of dialogue.

    Hints

    Dialogue uses quotation marks around the words.

    Dialogue usually goes together with words like said, told, or asked to show who is speaking.

    There are 2 correct choices and 2 false choices.

    Solution

    EXAMPLES OF DIALOGUE:

    • "I already know that!" she said.
    • "Let's go now," they answered.
    These examples use quotation marks as well as the words 'said' and 'answered' to indicate dialogue.

  • Complete the text.

    Hints

    Dialogue uses quotation marks around the words.

    Dialogue usually goes together with words like said, or asked to show who is speaking.
    Asked would follow dialogue with a question.

    Dialogue can help with sequences in a story (first, next, after that, last).

    Solution

    Jane needed help with her story.
    "What is missing?" she asked Ernie.
    "You still need dialogue," he answered. "First, remember, what was said."
    Jane looked frustrated.
    "But I can't remember!" she said.
    "That's ok," said Ernie. "Next, ask what would this person say."