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Introducing a Narrative Topic

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Introducing a Narrative Topic
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.2A

Basics on the topic Introducing a Narrative Topic

Let's learn about introducing a narrative topic with Ernie!

Transcript Introducing a Narrative Topic

Ernie just joined The Storytellers Algorithm at the annual Robot Roundup, where he will write and share his story and show off his cosplay! Let's help Ernie improve his writing by learning about... Introducing an Narrative Topic. A topic is what the text is mainly about. It's important to express your ideas clearly when writing a narrative so that the reader can follow the plot. The first paragraph, or exposition, introduces the characters, setting, and sometimes the conflict of the story, setting the stage for the events to come. The exposition should start with a hook, which is something to grab the reader's' attention and create interest. Ernie is writing about a robot named Roberta who felt all alone. He should start with a hook that intrigues the reader and makes them want to keep reading to find out what happens next. Ernie starts with, 'Roberta was a lonely robot on Planet Cyberlandia, until one day everything changed.' Readers may find this unbelievable or interesting and want to keep reading. After the hook, always provide more details about the setting and any relevant background information that helps to build the narrative world. Next, he says, 'One day in her shop, she figured out how to build other robots just like her, each with their own unique personalities and talents.' The next section should concentrate on developing the world by providing additional details that contribute to a vivid and engaging narrative. Roberta's new robot friends were so thankful they wanted to plan a party. Roberta was so happy that her ocular unit shed an oil tear.' So, Ernie will add more about what they will do and added details about the main character, Roberta, great job Ernie! But what is this here? (...) It says, 'I like bagels!' Does this support our story about Roberta? (...) No, that's a fact about Ernie! In writing, it's important to stick to the topic so the reader doesn't get confused, so we will delete this line. Instead, Ernie will wrap-up the exposition by adding a sentence that transitions to the rising action. This sentence introduces the main conflict or problem that the characters will face and hints at what might happen next. Roberta and her new friends started to plan a party, little did they know that a new challenge was about to arise - a challenge that would test their skills and their friendship like never before.' This ending sentence creates a sense of anticipation and sets up the main conflict that the characters will face. Ernie wants to include an illustration. We can include illustrations IF they are related to our story. Does this picture relate to the story about Roberta? (...) No, the picture of a bagel sandwich has nothing to do with his topic! Keeping the robot illustration is the best choice! Now, readers can SEE and get excited about what they're learning! From here, Ernie can write more paragraphs that include details about the conflict of the story and eventually end with the resolution. While he does that, let's remember! When writing a narrative text, it’s important to communicate your ideas clearly, so the reader understands what your story is about. The first paragraph, or exposition, introduces the characters, setting, and sometimes the conflict of the story, setting the stage for the events to come. It should start with a hook, which is something to grab the reader's' attention and create interest in the story. After the hook, always provide more details about the story to help build the narrative world. Then end with a sentence that creates a sense of anticipation and sets up the main conflict or problem that the characters will face in the rising action of the story. Feel free to add a picture or illustration (...) IF it's useful and relates to the story. "The end!"