Multiplication (of equal groups)

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Multiplication (of equal groups)
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Contents

In this Video on Equal Groups Multiplication

Chef Squeaks and Imani are doing inventory for their cooking show, “Stuff Your Cheeks With Mr. Squeaks”. The quantities of all the ingredients are labeled using multiplication expressions on the packages. However, Squeaks and Imani don't know how to multiply, so they haven’t a clue how many ingredients are actually there. In this video, Chef Squeaks and Imani learn how to model using equal groups for multiplication to determine the amount of food available

Elementary Math Concepts, Equal Groups Multiplication

Let’s learn more about multiplication as equal groups and how to use multiplication strategies with equal groups to solve equal groups multiplication examples.

Equal Groups Multiplication: Definition

Multiplication always involves joining equal groups. It is a way of finding the total number of items in equal-sized groups. When we see a multiplication expression, like two times eight, think of 'times' as meaning 'equal groups of'. So we can also say this as two equal groups of eight. This tells us there are two equal groups with eight mushrooms in each!

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What Are Equal Groups in Multiplication?

The first factor, or number, tells us how many groups there are.

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The second factors or number, tells us how many mushrooms are in each group.

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When we model this, we can easily count all sixteen mushrooms to calculate the product, or answer. Thus equal groups and multiplication go hand in hand.

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Example of Equal Groups Multiplication

Let’s practice teaching multiplication using equal groups with the example three times five. Using the idea of equal groups, we can say this is three equal groups of five. The first factor, three, tells us to draw equal groups for multiplication. We'll draw three large boxes to represent our groups.

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Then, the second factor, five, tells us how many dots to make in each group. We'll make five dots in each box.

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Now we can solve this by counting up all the dots. There are fifteen dots in all, so the product of three times five is fifteen.

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Summary of Steps: Multiplication Equal Groups

Remember, ​​multiplication is a way of finding the total number of items in equal-sized groups. Using this idea of equal groups, we can restate any multiplication expression with the words 'equal groups of'.This helps us figure out what to draw to find the answer:

  • The first factor tells us how many groups, or boxes, to draw.

*The second factor tells us how many dots to draw in each.

  • Solve by counting up all the dots.

  • Finally, write the product.

Practice with Multiplication Equal Groups Worksheets for 3rd Grade

Have you practiced with equal groups multiplication worksheets yet? On this website, you can also find multiplication with equal groups worksheets and equal groups multiplication activities.

Transcript Multiplication (of equal groups)

Chef Squeaks and Imani are doing inventory for their cooking show, “Stuff Your Cheeks With Mr. Squeaks”. They are checking to see how many ingredients are available. All the ingredients are labeled with a multiplication expression, one number times another number, that represents how much is in the container. Let's help Chef Squeaks and Imani calculate how many ingredients there are using "Multiplication (of equal groups)". Multiplication is a way of finding the total number of items in equal-sized groups. When we see a multiplication expression, like two times eight, think of 'times' as meaning 'equal groups of'. So we can also say this as two equal groups of eight. This tells us there are two equal groups with eight mushrooms in each! The first factor, or number, tells us how many groups there are. The second factor, or number, tells us how many mushrooms are in each group. When we model this, we can easily count all sixteen mushrooms to calculate the product, or answer. For example, the jar of olives has the expression: three times five. Using the idea of equal groups, we can say this is three equal groups of five. The first factor, three, tells us to make three groups. We'll draw three large boxes to represent our groups. Then, the second factor, FIVE, tells us how many dots to make in each group. We'll make five dots in each box. Now we can solve by counting up all the dots. There are fifteen dots in all, so the product of three times five is fifteen. There are fifteen olives in the jar! Let's try it again with the can of tomatoes. The label says four times six. Using this idea of equal groups, we can say this is four equal groups of six. The first factor, four, tells us to make four groups, so how many boxes should we draw? We should draw four large boxes. Then, the second factor, six, tells us how many dots to make in each group, so how many dots should we draw in each box? We should draw six dots in each box. How do we calculate the product? We count up all the dots! There are twenty-four dots in all, so the product of four times six is twenty-four. There are twenty-four tomatoes in the can. Before we see if Chef Squeaks and Imani got what they needed, let's remember! Multiplication is a way of finding the total number of items in equal-sized groups. Using this idea of equal groups, we can restate any multiplication expression with the words 'equal groups of'. This helps us figure out what to draw to find the answer. The first factor tells us how many groups, or boxes, to draw. Then, the second factor tells us how many dots to draw in each. Solve by counting up all the dots. Finally, write the product. "Well it turns out there are enough ingredients for the next taping!" "Let's get these down to the kitchen...." "And I'll just leave this right here."